The initial hubs are expected to yield up to 4.5 tons of hydrogen each. This is enough hydrogen from each hub to power 100 heavy-duty commercial vehicles. - Photo: Hyzon

The initial hubs are expected to yield up to 4.5 tons of hydrogen each. This is enough hydrogen from each hub to power 100 heavy-duty commercial vehicles.

Photo: Hyzon

Hyzon Motors announced a memorandum of understanding to form a joint venture with renewable fuel company Raven SR, and build up to 100 hydrogen production hubs across the United States and globally.

Each hub is expected to convert organic waste at in nearly every form into locally-produced, renewable hydrogen for Hyzon’s zero-emission commercial vehicles, including garbage trucks. The first hub is planned to be built at a landfill in the San Francisco Bay Area, and is expected to be commissioned in 2022.

Raven SR owns a portfolio of patents for its conversion process, which enables it to be one of the only combustion-free, waste-to-hydrogen processes in the world, Hyzon officials said in a press release. In connection with this partnership, Hyzon has agreed to acquire a minority interest in Raven.

Each hub will contain Raven’s patented Steam/CO2 reformation process that converts all types of solid waste into renewable syngas and then into green hydrogen with costs that are similar to hydrogen produced using hydrocarbons, so-called “gray” hydrogen. In California, the hydrogen produced through Raven’s process is expected to benefit from the state’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS), allowing Hyzon to sell hydrogen to third parties at competitive prices, Hyzon official said.

The initial hubs are expected to process 50 tons of solid waste daily, per hub, and are expected to yield up to 4.5 tons of renewable green hydrogen each, enough hydrogen from each hub to power 100 heavy-duty commercial vehicles. Future hubs may be able to scale to five times larger to accommodate sites with higher hydrogen requirements.

One hundred hydrogen hubs could convert over 5,000 tons of waste per day and power over 10,000 trucks.

“Hyzon aims to be one of the first companies to supply our customers with a hydrogen fuel cell truck, including our own garbage trucks, at total cost of ownership parity with diesel-powered commercial vehicles,” said Craig Knight, CEO and co-founder of Hyzon.

Originally posted on Trucking Info

0 Comments