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Blog: Vocational trucks are susceptible to being targeted for staged accidents, which involves maneuvering an unsuspecting employee driver into an intentional crash in order to make a false insurance claim or to file a lawsuit against the driver’s employer.

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NHTSA Investigating Tesla Crash in Utah

U.S. safety regulators from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) are evaluating the circumstances connected to a Tesla Model S that slammed into a fire department vehicle in Jordan, Utah on May 13.

Tesla Removed from Crash Investigation for Violating NTSB Rules

Tesla will no longer be able to participate in the National Transportation Safety Board investigation of a fatal crash involving a Tesla Model X after it violated the agency’s rules on sharing investigative information before being vetted and confirmed.

NHTSA Delays EV Warning Noise Requirements

The deadline for requiring hybrids and electric vehicles to produce pedestrian-alerting noises to warn sight-impaired pedestrians and bicyclists has been pushed back until March.

CSA Safety Scores Must Distinguish Between Preventable and Non-Preventable Accidents

A growing number of fleets contend that Compliance, Safety & Accountability (CSA) program is in need of substantial improvement. Currently, a fleet’s score in the CSA safety monitoring system is based on all fleet-involved crashes, including those that the company’s driver did not cause and could not reasonably have prevented. This scoring criteria is contrary to accepted industry standards and, in the long run, will undermine the validity of the CSA program in the eyes of covered fleets.

5,000+ Accidents in W. Va State Fleet in Past 5 Years

CHARLESTON, WV - A legislative audit recently revealed that West Virginia state employees have had more than 5,000 accidents in state vehicles over the past five years, costing the state nearly $23 million in insurance claims and deductibles.

10 Recommendations: What Drivers Should Do After a Fleet Accident

Drivers must collect as much information as possible when involved in an accident while driving a company-provided vehicle. Failure to do so can lengthen the accident management process and, in a worst case scenario, create unnecessary liability exposure for the company. What information should be collected? What shouldn't be said? Here are 10 do's and don'ts for fleet managers and drivers to follow.

Fleet Safety Must be Your No. 1 Job Priority

In two decades of chronicling the history of fleet management, I have seen interest in fleet safety ebb and flow. In an annual survey I conduct of fleet managers, they rated fleet safety as their No. 2 concern, right behind the cost of fuel. Why the renewed interest in fleet safety? More and more fleet managers are reporting an uptick in preventable accidents. In addition, fleet managers are feeling pressure from other corporate departments to increase fleet driver safety.