Electric Vehicles

Nevada Utility Leads EV Expansion in Southwest

September 03, 2014

Photo courtesy of NV Energy.
Photo courtesy of NV Energy.

A new report issued by the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP) shows that Nevada’s major utility, NV Energy, is a leader in the Southwest and the nation in promoting clean electric vehicle transportation.

The utility has led by example, purchasing 12 EVs for its own fleet and installing publicly available charging stations at several of its office locations.

In addition, NV Energy has adopted policies and taken actions that create a positive environment for EV owners in Nevada. NV Energy provides electricity to approximately 1.2 million customers in Nevada, mainly in the state’s major metropolitan areas, via its subsidiaries Nevada Power Company in the south and Sierra Pacific Power Company in the north.

Through its Shared Investment Program, NV Energy has facilitated the installation of nearly half the public electric vehicle charging stations in the state.

NV Energy developed the program to improve range confidence and provided $500,000 to help fund new electric vehicle charging stations around Nevada. During 2013, the utility partnered with private and public sector entities to set up 133 individual charging ports at more than 47 locations statewide as part of the program. Charging stations have been installed at Nevada universities, airports, casinos, resorts, shopping centers, recreation destinations and municipal facilities.

Employers who provide charging to their employees were also eligible to participate in the program. NV Energy offered partners up to $7,000 off the cost of a dual port charger, about half the cost, according to the report.

The utility also offers a special electric vehicle billing rate that encourages people to charge their cars during the wee hours of the night, when demand is at its lowest and power plants typically are underutilized.

NV Energy first began offering lower electricity rates in 2009 to customers who owned electric vehicles. Customers had an incentive to shift their electricity use to times when demand was lower, and the utility had an opportunity to sell more electricity while avoiding the need to build new generating plants.

For more details, view the full report.

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