The prototype pouch cell that the team developed would enable an electric vehicle (EV) to travel up to 800km on a single charge, and it features a cycle life of over 1,000 charges. - Photo by Matthew Staver / NREL.

The prototype pouch cell that the team developed would enable an electric vehicle (EV) to travel up to 800km on a single charge, and it features a cycle life of over 1,000 charges.

Photo by Matthew Staver / NREL.

Researchers from the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) and the Samsung R&D Institute Japan (SRJ) have presented a study on high-performance, long-lasting all-solid-state batteries to Nature Energy, a scientific journal.

The prototype pouch cell that the team developed would enable an electric vehicle (EV) to travel up to 800km on a single charge, and it features a cycle life of over 1,000 charges. This research is expected to help drive the expansion of EVs, but the technology is not planned for market anytime soon. 

For the first time, Samsung’s researchers proposed utilizing a silver-carbon (Ag-C) composite layer as the anode. The team found that incorporating an Ag-C layer into a prototype pouch cell enabled the battery to support a larger capacity, a longer cycle life, and enhanced its overall safety, according to Samsung. 

Measuring 5 micrometers thick, the ultrathin Ag-C nanocomposite layer allowed the team to reduce anode thickness and increase energy density up to 900Wh/L. It also enabled them to make the prototype approximately 50% smaller by volume than a conventional lithium-ion battery.

Compared to lithium-ion batteries, which utilize liquid electrolytes, all-solid-state batteries support greater energy density, which opens the door for larger capacities. However, the lithium metal anodes, which are frequently used in all-solid-state batteries, are prone to trigger the growth of dendrites (tiny crystal spikes), which can produce undesirable side effects that reduce a battery’s lifespan and safety.

“The product of this study could be a seed technology for safer, high-performance batteries of the future,” said Dongmin Im, leader of this project and master at SAIT’s Next Generation Battery Lab. “Going forward, we will continue to develop and refine all-solid-state battery materials and manufacturing technologies to help take EV battery innovation to the next level.”

Originally posted on Fleet Forward

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