The new 2020 guidelines for NFPA 58, a liquefied petroleum gas code, specifies that the propane industry will adopt the K15 connection for all future autogas vehicles reinstated into service, purchased, or converted after Jan. 1, 2020. - Photo courtesy of Alliance AutoGas.

The new 2020 guidelines for NFPA 58, a liquefied petroleum gas code, specifies that the propane industry will adopt the K15 connection for all future autogas vehicles reinstated into service, purchased, or converted after Jan. 1, 2020.

Photo courtesy of Alliance AutoGas.

Fleets who incorporate propane-fueled assets into their operations at the beginning of 2020 will need to adopt a new refueling connection that utilizes a new type of valve.

The new 2020 guidelines for NFPA 58, a liquefied petroleum gas code, specifies that the propane industry will adopt the K15 connection for all future autogas vehicles reinstated into service, purchased, or converted after Jan. 1, 2020, according to Alliance AutoGas.

Unlike the outgoing ACME valve, which requires a threaded connection to the vehicle, the K15 was designed with a quick-connect design to a vehicle for refueling. This type of connection dramatically reduces fugitive emissions, which gases or vapors that are released due to leaks, during the autogas refueling process, making it more environmentally friendly and increasing driver safety, a release stated.

The average quick-connect K15 releases 76% less fugitive emissions when compared to the ACME connecter. The quick-connect K15 is also designed to be an almost identical refueling experience to gasoline or diesel.

The NFPA 58 code change is not retroactive to vehicles produced before Jan. 1, 2020, as these vehicles can be retro-fitted to the new K15 refueling valve. Quick-connect refueling nozzles, adaptors, and K15 refueling valves are readily available from your local propane equipment distributor, Alliance AutoGas said.

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