General Motors has proposed a national zero-emissions mandate taht would begin in 2021.
 - Photo courtesy of GM.

General Motors has proposed a national zero-emissions mandate taht would begin in 2021.

Photo courtesy of GM.

General Motors has proposed a national mandate that would require that 25% of the vehicles sold by manufacturers in 2030 would be zero-emission vehicles, according to comments submitted as part of President Trump's plan to roll back fuel economy standards.

GM sent its feedback to the Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Friday.

If adopted, the plan could result in 7 million long-range electric cars on the road by 2030, which would reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 375 million tons between 2021 and 2030.

With the proposal, the automaker is departing from its Detroit rivals. GM now offers the Chevrolet Bolt EV battery-electric hatchback and plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt.

The plan is based on zero-emission vehicle programs adopted by California and nine other states mostly in the northeast. The programs consider plug-in hybrids, battery-electric vehicles, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles as zero emission.

GM's proposal would start the national zero-emission requirement at 7% in 2021, and increase the level by 2% each year to 15% by 2025 and 25% by 2030. Credits would be issued for each zero-emissions vehicle sold, based on its electric range. Manufacturers would be able to average, bank, and trade the credits.

The program would provide additional consideration for EVs deployed as autonomous vehicles and in ride-hailing programs.

Originally posted on Automotive Fleet

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