An FCEVs carries a high-pressure hydrogen tank instead of a gasoline tank found on conventional vehicles and generates electricity inside fuel cells to drive the electric motor.  -  Photo: Honda

An FCEVs carries a high-pressure hydrogen tank instead of a gasoline tank found on conventional vehicles and generates electricity inside fuel cells to drive the electric motor.

Photo: Honda

Honda announced that it will produce an all-new hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) based on the recently launched Honda CR-V starting in 2024 at its Performance Manufacturing Center (PMC) in Marysville, Ohio.

This new zero-emissions vehicle will contribute to Honda’s previously announced goal to make battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and FCEVs represent 100% of its global auto sales by 2040, according to Honda's news release.

Honda added the new CR-V-based FCEV also will mark North America’s first production vehicle to combine a plug-in feature with FCEV technology in one model. This enables the driver to charge the onboard battery to deliver EV driving around town with the flexibility of fast hydrogen refueling for longer trips.

“Honda established our goal to realize carbon neutrality by 2050 and the complete electrification of our vehicle lineup by 2040 is critical to achieving it,” said Gary Robinson, vice president of Auto Planning & Strategy for American Honda Motor Co., Inc. “As we accelerate our plan to produce Honda battery EVs in the United States, we also will begin low volume production of fuel cell electric vehicles there to further explore their great potential as part of a sustainable transportation future.”

Since opening in 2016, the PMC has been responsible for the production of the Acura NSX supercar, multiple Acura PMC Edition vehicles (including TLX, RDX, and MDX) along with Honda Performance Development race cars.

“Our associates at the Performance Manufacturing Center have really enjoyed the opportunity to successfully introduce several specialty vehicles into the market,” said Gail May, PMC plant leader. “This facility is perfect for the production of a new Honda fuel cell electric vehicle, as our small-volume capability enables us to really leverage the skill and expertise of our team to produce quality zero-emission vehicles here in North America.”

More details about the all-new FCEV version of the CR-V will be announced closer to its introduction in 2024. 

Since the introduction of its first commercially available fuel-cell vehicle, the FCX, in 2002, Honda said it has made technological advancements in fuel-cell vehicle operation in both hot and freezing weather while meeting customer expectations and safety regulations.

In 2021, Honda ended the production of its hydrogen fuel-cell Clarity models due to lack of demand and the company's focus on electrification, according to Nikkei.

In an effort to support the wider introduction of fuel-cell vehicles, Honda has invested more than $14 million in California’s hydrogen refueling network. This includes joining the public-private partnership H2USA in May 2013.

Originally posted on Fleet Forward

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