The new engine will provide fleet owners with diesel-like performance and durability, uptime, and low total cost of ownership. - Photo: Cummins

The new engine will provide fleet owners with diesel-like performance and durability, uptime, and low total cost of ownership.

Photo: Cummins

Cummins unveiled its B6.7 Propane engine for medium-duty fleet owners, which will be built on Cummins recently announced fuel-agnostic B-series platform and powered with propane Autogas, according to the company's news release.

Backed by data and support from the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC), the new engine offers fleets a path to decarbonization without compromising on performance or range.

“There is no single path to zero emissions that will work for all application types across all markets and duty cycles. Propane autogas can do its part today in the collective effort toward decarbonization,” said Tucker Perkins, president/CEO of PERC. “Using propane autogas today is an immediate solution toward reducing harmful emissions.” 

The new engine will provide fleet owners with diesel-like performance and durability, uptime, and low total cost of ownership, with power expected ratings between 280–360 hp and 600–860 lb-ft of torque. 

“We’ve had a strong and collaborative relationship with PERC throughout the development, testing and evaluation phases of this engine. We’re thrilled to continue that partnership and formally announce plans to bring the B6.7 Propane to market,” said Sam Geckler, technical project leader, Cummins.

The B6.7 Propane is suited for medium-duty truck, vocational, school bus, and terminal tractor markets, making it a low-emissions solution designed to meet or exceed EPA and CARB regulations in 2024.

“We’re confident this engine will deliver the power, performance and efficiency that users expect from Cummins. We also expect it to deliver the lowest CO2 emissions of any propane Autogas-powered engine, making it an attractive and cost-effective way for fleets to lower total transportation emissions,” Geckler said.

Originally posted on Metro Magazine

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