Natural Gas – Conversions, Vehicles and Technology

An Alt-Fuel Pioneer in Oklahoma

September 2013, Green Fleet Magazine - Feature

by Julie Sutor, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Central Oklahoma Clean Cities (COCC) Coordinator Yvonne Anderson (second from left) cuts the ribbon, dedicating two CNG refuse trucks for use by the City of Norman, Okla.
Central Oklahoma Clean Cities (COCC) Coordinator Yvonne Anderson (second from left) cuts the ribbon, dedicating two CNG refuse trucks for use by the City of Norman, Okla.

In 1998, when Yvonne Anderson took the reins of the recently formed Central Oklahoma Clean Cities (COCC) coalition, petroleum was the only game in town for the region’s transportation sector. Fifteen years later, Oklahoma boasts more than 200 alternative-fueling stations, due in great part to an enduring commitment to sustainability by Anderson and dozens of public and private sector fleets.

COCC member fleets that have helped lead the way include Oklahoma Natural Gas Company, the City of Oklahoma City, the City of Norman, the State of Oklahoma, the University of Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State University. Under Anderson’s leadership, the coalition established the state’s first municipally owned biofuels station, first publicly accessible E-85 station, first multi-fuel alternative-fueling station, first municipal public-access natural gas station, and first municipal electric vehicle charging station.

“Back in the mid-1990s, we were starting from scratch,” Anderson said. “But, we’ve all been working together to move forward for a cleaner, greener, more secure energy future.”

The City of Midwest City completed a new biofuels island in 2012 for E-85 and B-20 blends.
The City of Midwest City completed a new biofuels island in 2012 for E-85 and B-20 blends.

In 2012 alone, COCC stakeholders saved more than 3 million gallons of petroleum and averted more than 8,000 tons of green-house gas emissions. And, fleets are keeping the momentum going with new alternative-fuel vehicle acquisitions and infrastructure development.

Oklahoma City recently added two all-electric Nissan LEAF sedans to its municipal motor pool; they charge in a highly visible downtown location, giving residents an up-close look at electric transportation technology.

In 2012, the City of Norman opened a new compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station, which serves two industrial mowers, three refuse trucks, one dual-CNG-engine street sweeper, one heavy-duty field service truck, 36 light-duty vehicles, and one school bus.

The City of Oklahoma City has two 2012 Nissan LEAF sedans. In addition, the City fleet includes electric, hybrid, CNG, and B-20- powered vehicles.
The City of Oklahoma City has two 2012 Nissan LEAF sedans. In addition, the City fleet includes electric, hybrid, CNG, and B-20- powered vehicles.

COCC’s successes have gained national attention. In June 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy inducted Anderson into the Clean Cities Hall of Fame.

“For 15 years, Yvonne Anderson has proven herself to be a true pioneer and a dedicated mentor to others in the deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles,” said Clean Cities National Director Dennis Smith.

Comment On This Story

Name:  
Email:  
Comment: (Maximum 10000 characters)  
Leave this field empty:
* Please note that every comment is moderated.

 

FleetFAQ

Fleet Management And Leasing

Merchants Experts will answer your questions and challenges

View All
 

Grants & Subsidies

Alternative Fueling Station Locator

Alternative Fueling Station Locator

Find your closest station or plan a route. Locate biodiesel, electric, ethanol, hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), liquified natural gas (LNG), and propane across America.

Start Your Search