Hydrogen – Fuel Cell Technology, Infrastructure

Feds Commit $7M Toward Hydrogen Vehicles

May 29, 2014

Toyota has been testing an engineering prototype of a fuel cell vehicle planned for the 2015 model year. Photo courtesy of Toyota.
Toyota has been testing an engineering prototype of a fuel cell vehicle planned for the 2015 model year. Photo courtesy of Toyota.

The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded $7 million to projects expected to advance the development of hydrogen fuel cell systems for variously sized vehicles.

The funds will go toward improving on-board hydrogen storage that will "be critical to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies," according to a release.

The grants have been given as follows:

  • Materia of Pasadena, Calif. will receive $2 million to reduce the cost of compressed hydrogen storage systems. The project will demonstrate a novel resin system that reduces the use of expensive carbon fiber composites for high pressure storage tanks.
  • PPG Industries of Greensboro, N.C., will receive $1.2 million to demonstrate a novel high strength glass fiber that is stronger than the carbon fibers used today at half of the cost.
  • Sandia National Laboratories of Livermore, Calif., will receive $1.2 million to systematically screen low cost alternative materials for use in hydrogen storage systems.
  • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of Livermore, Calif., will receive $1.2 million to develop a reversible, high-capacity storage material that can bond to and release hydrogen in a vehicle, reducing the amount of hydrogen that needs to be pumped in the tank.
  • Ardica of San Francisco, Calif., will receive $1.2 million to transition and scale-up a low-cost production process for the production of aluminum hydride, a potential high-capacity hydrogen storage material.
  • HRL Laboratories of Malibu, Calif., will receive $1 million to develop high capacity reversible hydrogen storage materials that have properties needed for practical hydrogen storage applications.

The Department of Energy produced a primer about how fuel cell technology works. View that video here.

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